British Army Medical Rejection Statistics

2 months ago, we wrote to the Army Secretariat at the Army Headquarters to request information regarding recruitment statistics to gain an insight into the scale of the problem of medical rejections.
For your information, we have provided the statistics in full for your review below...



The information has been treated under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) 2000.

1. How many people were rejected from the British Army for medical reasons in 2018?

26,460 applicants were initially rejected in calendar year 2018 for medical reasons. Some of these may have since successfully appealed.

2. How many people were rejected from the British Army for medical reasons in January 2019?
(You may recall the 'Snowflake' recruitment campaign which 'successfully' found 9700 new applicants in January 19? I wanted to know how many were rejected on medical grounds - it turns out one third were...)

3,372 applicants were initially rejected in Jan 19 for medical reasons. Some of these may have since successfully appealed.

3. When was the last time the medical policy was reviewed? How often is it reviewed and how specifically is it reviewed?

The Medical Employment Standards for the Armed Forces are kept under continual review by specialist occupational physicians from the three Services, confirming that they are in line with current Service need and employment policy. Further, this ensures the standards taken into account UK best practice in occupational medical policy, medical evidence, improved diagnostic procedures and treatments.

4. How many personnel currently serve in the British Army with an allergy? How many of those have been deployed on operations overseas?

Of UK Army Armed Forces personnel in service on 1 March 2019:

6,651 had a Read code for an allergy entered into their electronic primary health care record . Of these personnel:
  • 4,253 deployed on operations overseas at least once between 1 April 2007 and 31 December 2018.
  • 139 had a Read code for a nut allergy entered into their electronic primary health care record. Of these personnel:
  • 73 deployed on operations overseas at least once between 1 April 2007 and 31 December 2018.

15,083 had a Read code for hay fever or pollen allergy entered into their electronic primary health care record. Of these personnel:
  • 9,850 deployed on operations overseas at least once between 1 April 2007 and 31 December 2018.

5. How many Army applicants were rejected in 2018 for asthma?

278 applicants were initially rejected for asthma in calendar year 2018. Some of these may have since successfully appealed.

6. How many Army applicants were rejected in 2018 for eczema?

503 applicants were initially rejected for eczema in calendar year 2018. Some of these may have since successfully appealed.

7. How many Army applicants were rejected in 2018 for a nut allergy?

No information held. Nut allergies are not recorded centrally as an individual category during application.

8. How many Army applicants were rejected in 2018 for other allergies?

173 applicants were initially rejected for allergies (including lactose and food intolerance) in calendar year 2018. Some of these may have since successfully appealed.

Notes/Caveats:
 All data is for all UK Army Regular and Reserve personnel.
 The information presented relates only to the Read codes associated with “allergy”, “nut allergy” and “hay fever”. Therefore, the information presented does not include symptoms that may be as a result of allergies, e.g. anaphylaxis or dermatitis.
 The electronic patient record has information that is Read coded. Read codes are a set of clinical codes designed for Primary Care to record the everyday care of a patient. The number of personnel with a Read code for a nut allergy is a subset of the number of personnel with a Read code for any allergy. This is because all nut allergy Read codes appear in the Read code list used to search for all allergies.
 The number of personnel with a Read code for hay fever or pollen allergy is not a subset of the number of personnel with a Read code for any allergy. This is because while “pollen allergy” appears in the Read code list used to search for all allergies, “hay fever” does not.
 Any data entered as free text only in the patients’ medical record will not be included in the figures presented as this information is not available in the data warehouse, therefore these figures are a minimum.
 The Defence Medical Information Capability Programme (DMICP) was rolled out in 2007 and is the source of electronic, integrated healthcare records for primary healthcare and some MOD specialist care providers.
 DMICP is a live data source and is subject to change. Date of extract: 29 April 2019.
 Deployment data is derived from the Joint Personnel Administration (JPA) system which was introduced in April 2007. Service personnel data is derived from the JPA system, which is a combination of mandatory and non-mandatory fields populated by unit administrators and voluntary fields that Armed Forces personnel can choose to complete.
 Overseas deployments are defined as the total number of personnel deployed outside the UK’s borders. This includes all military personnel mobilised for contingency, wartime, United Nations peacekeeping and humanitarian operations.

 


1 comment


  • Carol Urry

    I would like to write requesting information regarding the armed forces employing/refusing applications of people with Aspergers Syndrome. It states in the Joint Services Publication 950 covering Aspergers Syndrome that the MoD do allow people into the armed forces that do not show the ‘classic signs’ of Aspergers Syndrome, I would be interested to hear what these are.


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